If politics and government interests you, check out these classes at A&M-Texarkana.
Texas A&M University-Texarkana’s Political Science program is once again offering several intriguing and valuable classes this spring semester, January 20 to May 15.

Introduction to Constitution Law (PSCI 320) is the perfect class for learning the basics of the U.S. constitutional order – the ways in which the Constitution sets up the framework of our government.  The class focuses on how citizens can keep watch over the abuse of government power, including their rights of speech, press, voting, religious freedom, warrant expectation, and avoiding cruel and unusual punishment.

And, for those interested in a clearer understanding of global events and the U.S.’s role worldwide, PSCI 350 – International Relations – is being offered.  Among the topics covered are international theories, conflict, cooperation, trade, and negotiation, as well as state power and terrorism.

The faculty is teaching their very popular course that gets at the heart of why people behave the way they do when making political decisions: PSCI 395, Introduction to Political Science Research Methods.  One of the things students learn in this introductory course is how to criticize scholarly articles and books.  As Professor Walter Casey says, “Nothing can save a piece of research that begins with a bad question or that follows a flawed research design.”

Lastly, the Political Science Internship provides students the chance to work in city government.  Mentored by Texarkana city officials in both Arkansas and Texas, interns learn first-hand about different departments and areas, from human resources to city court, from parks to the police.  Once gaining such experience, many interns have gone on to work in other cities throughout the region.

A&M-Texarkana’s Political Science faculty members are known for helping students reach their scholarly and professional goals. For example, the Supreme Court case summaries students will write in Professor Gary Bugh’s Introduction to Constitution Law class this spring will be submitted for publication in the upcoming international Encyclopedia of Election Law and Democracy.

Professor Casey will be presenting conference papers co-authored with A&M students Kishon Daniels and Damon Page at the Arkansas Political Science Association annual meeting and at the Midwest Political Science Association conference in Chicago.

Recently, Political Science major Hannah Dyal was accepted and is now attending the School of Law at UT-Austin.  U.S. News & World Report currently ranks UT Law as the 15th best law school in the nation.